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How to Make a Picture Frame Wreath

April 28, 2016   //  Posted in: Decor, DIY, DIY Network Projects, Holiday-Related Projects   //  By: Emily   //  Leave a comment
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This post was originally published on DIY Network’s blog Made + Remade in December 2012.

I added some finishing touches to our home in preparation for hosting family during next week’s Christmas holiday. One of my favorite DIY projects was a quick upcycled frame-turned-wreath project. After all, use your imagination, what looks more like a modern rectangular wreath than a picture frame?

Voila.

DIY rustic wreath made of a reclaimed wood picture frame.

Side note: How great are strung light-filled jars? And the electric candlestick fits right in with the crowd.

I started this project with a common picture frame (mine being a handmade barnwood frame with a 9″x12″ opening). It’s pretty as a frame with pictures in it, but it has sat unused for a few years and seemed like a great proportion for a DIY wreath hung on the door or indoor as holiday decor:

DIY rustic wreath made of a reclaimed wood picture frame.

With red acrylic paint (the same bottle that I’ve been using on my holiday wrapping paper stamps!), I brushed stripes onto the exterior of the frame with a foam brush.

DIY rustic wreath made of a reclaimed wood picture frame.

Note how the stripes are positioned to resemble a wrapped package? (Or a first aid symbol, yes, this may transition nicely into poolside decor.)

DIY rustic wreath made of a reclaimed wood picture frame.

I used some red string to put a bow on it. I tried out some stiffer red ribbon too, the traditional kind that curls when you zip-line it with the scissors, but this floppier more organic string felt like a better fit for the style of the frame and for my home.

DIY rustic wreath made of a reclaimed wood picture frame.

My last-minute seasonal masterpiece. It was totally brainstormed as a decoration for our front door, but once I finished it I decided that it would be more enjoyed in place of some of our wall art.

How are you staging your home for the holidays?

DIY rustic wreath made of a reclaimed wood picture frame.

Try These Savory Cider Recipes

April 28, 2016   //  Posted in: DIY Network Projects, Kitchen   //  By: Emily   //  Leave a comment
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This post was originally published on DIY Network’s blog Made + Remade in November 2014.

Bottoms up! Apple cider is an obvious go-to for fall parties and festivities, but this year rethink the formula and step outside of the norm with ingredients that take your drink to the next level. We’re all about the Made + Remade over here, so be sure to share your favorite Remade cider recipes in the comments!

Go for a float. Chilled cider, a scoop of vanilla ice cream, and a dash of brown sugar on the rim. Twirl on some whipped cream for effect. A must try.

Cider float with vanilla ice cream.

The ultimate after-dinner drink. Combine cider with soft butter, brown sugar, cinnamon, and star anise. (For more grown-up cider recipes, check out Food Network…yum!)

You can’t go wrong with cinnamon sugar on the rim of your glass or mug. Perfect warm or chilled, enjoyed by kids and adults alike.

Cinnamon sugar cup of cider.

Berry-licious (this is your new Thanksgiving treat!). Combine warm cider with a tablespoon of fresh cooked cranberries.

Cinnamon sugar cup of cider and cranberries.

A tasty caramel apple. Add a tablespoon of caramel syrup to your cider. Serve the drink warm or chilled.

What other ways do you like to remake classic apple cider?

Creating An Electric Candlestick

April 28, 2016   //  Posted in: Decor, DIY, DIY Network Projects, Holiday-Related Projects   //  By: Emily   //  Leave a comment
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This post was originally published on DIY Network’s blog Made + Remade in December 2012.

I found the perfect inspiration for my latest project at a local salvage shop, a $1 teak candleholder that had both weight and form and that au natural hardwood appeal that I enjoy filling my home with. The candle holder itself feels incomplete. Surely it was a set at one point, maybe it had additional pieces, like a hurricane surround that sat on its ledge. Forever a mystery.

Anyways, I had a good idea when I saw it, so I paired it with a simple snap-in base socket, and made myself a unique DIY light to brighten my home.

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.

First things first: As I strategized how to fit this wooden base with electrical fitting, I chose a snap-in candelabra base socket because it’s very narrow, and came with built-in metal “ears” that I knew would help grip the socket into the narrow candlestick hole. It, with its 6-foot cord and switch, only cost $5.

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.

The lucky candle holder itself was priced at $1 at a local VOA, and as I already said, was the perfect accent for our home whether it was holding a candle or upcycled into something new.

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.

I bored through the hardwood candlestick with a 1″ paddle bit to both widen and deepen the hole which the electrical wire would run within.

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.

With the hole drilled through the length of the wood the cord had a place to run, but I also needed to make space for the cord to bend and run to the wall. The best solution I could come up with was to sand down the base gently using a Dremel with sandpaper attachment. The resulting gouge in the wood accommodates the wire without causing the base to be putting any pressure on the wire at all.

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.

With the socket base inserted and the metal ears holding it securely in place, the light was fully wired in all of 2 seconds.

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.

To accompany the teak frame, I picked up a “vintage style” bulb with classic filament design. While this 2-pack from The Home Depot cost $6 (priced higher than your everyday chandelier lightbulb but at a lower price point than those I found online), the 40 watt bulb itself adds a unique impact and really finishes off the piece.

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.

And when it’s lit, I can’t help but be attracted to it like a moth. So pretty.

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.

What’ve you made lately from common salvage finds?

Upcycle a candlestick holder with electric fittings to make an electric candlestick.